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A Delightful Journey Through the History of Throwing the Bridal Bouquet

Flowers have long been cherished as symbols of beauty, love, and affection. They hold a prominent place in weddings, where they add an extra touch of joy to the occasion. In this article, we will...

A bride gets ready to throw a wedding bouquet Flowers have long been cherished as symbols of beauty, love, and affection. They hold a prominent place in weddings, where they add an extra touch of joy to the occasion. In this article, we will explore the fascinating tradition of throwing bridal bouquets and uncover the meaningful messages conveyed by the diverse types of flowers used.

History of Throwing the Bouquet

A newlywed couple stands together while the bride holds the wedding flowers The tradition of throwing the bouquet has deep roots in various cultures. In ancient Greece and Rome, fragrant herbs and spices were used to ward off evil spirits and signify new beginnings, fertility, and loyalty. As time went on, English brides incorporated fragrant herbs like dill into their bouquets to represent lust and used spices to ward off bad luck. Guests would attempt to grab something belonging to the bride for good luck, and to escape their clutches, the bride threw her bouquet into the crowd. This is believed to be the origin of the bouquet toss tradition.

During the Victorian era, flowers became an integral part of wedding bouquets, especially after Queen Victoria included Galanthus Snowdrops, myrtle, and orange blossoms in her own bouquet. The language of flowers was highly significant in Victorian times, and couples would exchange specific flowers to express their relationship. Flowers from a wedding were also treasured by the bride throughout her lifetime. Although the tradition of throwing the bouquet originated in England, it gradually spread to countries with English influence, such as America.

Symbolic Meaning and Language of Flowers

A bridal bouquet with many types of flowers held by the bride If you're using roses for your bouquet, it's important to choose the right color as each variation carries its own symbolic meaning. For example, white or beige roses symbolize innocence, burgundy roses represent lust, red roses signify love and happiness, pink roses express loveliness, yellow roses signify friendship, and orange roses captivate with fascination. The symbolic meanings of flowers can vary across cultures, and personal experiences and preferences can also add unique significance.

During the Victorian era, flower symbolism was so prevalent that a bouquet could convey an entire message to a friend or lover. Let's take a look at some common wedding flowers and their meanings:

  • Anemone: Anticipation, expectation
  • Baby’s Breath: Innocence
  • Calla Lily: Purity and faith
  • Carnation: Pink for boldness, red for love, and white for talent
  • Chrysanthemum, Mums: Abundance, wealth, truth
  • Freesia: Innocence, friendship, sweetness, thoughtfulness
  • Gardenias: Joy
  • Hydrangea: Honesty, heartfelt emotion, gratitude, understanding
  • Iris: Faith, wisdom
  • Lilacs: Love’s first emotion
  • Lilly: Magnificence, majesty, honor, truth
  • Lilly of the Valley: Purity, humility, happiness
  • Orchids: Love, beauty
  • Peony: Beauty, good fortune, bashfulness, honor, love, romance
  • Stock: Lasting beauty
  • Tulips: Yellow for hopeless love and red for passion

Furthermore, the bridegroom traditionally wears a boutonniere that matches the bride's bouquet, symbolizing love and unity.

Catching the Bouquet

A bride throws the bouquet as she leaves with the groom Catching the bouquet has traditionally been seen as a sign that the unmarried lady who catches it will be the next to wed. In modern weddings, all women, whether married or not, often participate in the bouquet toss. However, some may feel hesitant or embarrassed about joining in. To make it more inclusive and enjoyable for all, consider framing the bouquet toss as a symbol of good luck or even organize a fun dance competition for the bouquet. Ultimately, the guest who catches the bouquet gets to keep a beautiful arrangement of flowers that were part of your special day.

Remember, it's your wedding, and you have the freedom to choose the flowers that resonate with you the most. Whether you decide to match your décor, bridesmaid dresses, or simply follow your own preferences, understanding the traditions and symbolism behind bridal flowers adds an extra layer of meaning to your celebration. Embrace the beauty and joy that flowers bring to your wedding day!

Image Sources:

  1. A bride gets ready to throw a wedding bouquet - Image
  2. A newlywed couple stands together while the bride holds the wedding flowers - Image
  3. A bridal bouquet with many types of flowers held by the bride - Image
  4. A bride throws the bouquet as she leaves with the groom - Image
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